The Gurdjieff Journal

Back Issue - #8 Volume 2 Issue 4

The Gurdjieff Journal™ - Issue #8

Why Ouspensky
Left Gurdjieff
Part VI

Gurdjieff closes the Institute and four months later begins to write All & Everything: Beelzebub's Tales to His Grandson, with Orage editing the English version. Orage's identification strengthens as he falls in love with Jessie Dwight and begins to assert his 'independence' from Gurdjieff.

Is 'Prince Ozay'
Really Gurdjieff?
Part I

In his book The Unending Quest, the Englishman Paul Dukes relates his first encounter with 'Prince Ozay' in St. Petersburg.

Working in the World:

The Unabomber & Barbarism

Ouspensky spoke to Gurdjieff of "the terrifying mechanization that was being developed in the big European cities...." As Ouspensky saw, and most likely also the Unabomber, "People are turning into machines." What will keep us from turning toward barbarism? Gurdjieff has a unique perspective on this question, "A man may be a man while working with machines. There is another kind of mechanization which is much more dangerous; being a machine oneself."

Thornton Wilder Remembers Gurdjieff

The writer Thornton Wilder recounts his first impressions of Gurdjieff, from Thornton Wilder, Memoirs II.

Book Review:

A Hero of Our Time
by Mikhail Lermontov

"When I was about six I read two books which produced an enormous impression on me. They were Lermontoff's 'A Hero of Our Time' and Turgenieff's 'A Sportsman's Sketches'."—P.D. Ouspensky

Critas

Tidbits gleaned from the world and the Work.



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